Archive for how to for artists

Every New Endeavor

deserves a write up!

In these past couple of months I have been attempting to get my proverbial feet wet in venues other than Etsy. Cafepress.com I have been involved in for some time, but hadn’t sold anything until recently. Zazzle.com as you know, I have recently become involved in, and now 1000Markets.com.

1000Markets.com is a growing e commerce site like Etsy, ArtFire and the like, but with a new a different twist. 

As stated in the 1000Markets.com  “About Us” page:

“We are a community of marketplaces, large and small, connecting artisan merchants with the people who love their products.

Our markets are more than just collections of products;
they are full of people and stories. They have voices and
personalities.

Our merchants are small, independent, artisan businesses
built by people who love their craft. They make and sell
unique products, based on their own vision, personality and
story. Working together, these artisans create marketplace
communities – gathering places where merchants can
exchange ideas, and customers can browse and talk.

Our markets are large and small, broad and narrow. Some
have themes, like food, crafts, or art. Others cultivate a
sense of place around a region. And some exist simply
because the people in them share friendship or common
values. Each market fosters its own one-of-a-kind
community, always unique and interesting.”

After I joined this site, I began doing more searching of Mexican/Dia de los Muertos items and found that there were indeed a number of merchants whose work was dedicated to this theme. I started a thread asking if anyone would be interested in a Market dedicated to the Dia de los Muertos theme and received great response! I contacted the administrative team and they agreed. So, now there is a Day of the Dead Market on the site!

Here is a little about our Day of the Dead Market:

“We are a growing number of diverse artisans who appreciate the Latino culture and express the meaning of the Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos celebration. We are dedicated to bringing you colorful, quality items that hold a fine respect and honor this ever increasingly popular occasion. We view our fellow members of this market as friends and allies. We are continually working toward developing a community of artisans who respect and honor the traditions of the Mexican culture and Dia de los Muertos specifically. We encourage new, colorful, bold, artistic expression in our products.

We understand that the customers looking for Dia de los Muertos items are a unique and diverse group of people. They are looking for that different something to express in a colorful and oft times humorous manner to be reminded of the personal meaning behind this celebration. We are confident that the products listed in our Market are worthy of such expression.”

Here is a sampling of the pieces listed in this market of which I am the manager and quite proud of the artisans represented in the Market. The following are the artists in order as they appear in the photos here:

sinkitty, jtnee, PattyMara, estudiomartita,

and myself – vanfleetstreetdesign.

 IMG_1719_display

 fiji2_015ok_display

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 La_Virgen_de_Calavera_display

                                                          children_of_war_skull_display                                                               

 u28508706

 I  hope you check out 1000Markets and the unique site they have to offer. Visit us at the Day of the Dead Market on the site! See you there!

 

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Selling on Zazzle.com

So I have a new endeavor at this time. I am currently selling my images on t-shirts, mouse pads, hats, aprons, stickers, coffee mugs, postage stamps, greeting cards, bags, buttons and the like. Although the sales are sporadic, it’s so much fun creating the items!

Zazzle.com allows you to put your images and text on selected items for sale through them. You choose a t shirt style and color, you place the image and text on the shirt, and you choose a percentage you would like to receive from that sale. (All products have a starting price and you decide how much profit you want from each sale.) Watch that you don’t bump that price up too high, then you’ll be stuck wondering why no one is buying!

Here are a few examples of my items for sale on http://zazzle.com/vanfleetstreetdesign  check out my shop there!

  tl-kiss_me_im_irish_too_tshirt

                            tl-so_nice_samba_song_greeting_card

tl-cinco_de_mayo_childrens_shirt

tl-usps_sugar_skull_stamps_postage

 

tl-the_deadly_bead_addiction_mousepad

Soul Reading

I know I had stated before that the purpose of this blog was to bring information and tips for you the artist, but I just had to tell you about an experience I had yesterday.

A couple of days ago I had the pleasure of interacting with Kathy Crabbe on Etsy.com . image

“Kathy is a Soul Reader. She offers psychic, astrological readings along with crystal healing exercises to help guide, transform and align you with your Soul’s true purpose. A Reading by Kathy is considered to be a wake-up call for the Soul and will provide you with a truly enlightening and powerful experience along with amazingly accurate insight and practical advice.”  (from her shop information)

kathycrabbe“WHAT IS A SOUL CARD READING?
A Soul card reading by Kathy will help you gain clarity and insight about your soul’s mission in life along with the tools necessary to bring about significant energy shifts. Kathy requests past, present and future guidance from the Divine, your ancestors and spirit guides to provide you with detailed answers to all your questions. Kathy works primarily with three magickal decks of her own creation: the lefty oracle cards, the goddess zodiac cards, and the fairy herbal healing cards. She also works with crystal healing exercises, astrological meditations and spoken affirmations.” (from her profile)

I was impressed with her knowledge and presence and decided to purchase a “mini soul reading”. This reading cost twenty cents. That’s right, you read it correctly, twenty cents. It gives you a brief glimpse into what is going on with you at this time. It is created for those who might be skeptics or just beginning an interest in matters spiritual. She “tunes into your energy for about 5 minutes and emails what she “sees”.

Kathy emailed me her impressions. I read them and could relate to practically everything she wrote. I won’t get too detailed about this, but one thing I will mention is this…Kathy reported that an old person named Joe was hanging around. He was affiliated with the railroad and wanted to tell me something. My grandfather’s name was Joe and although this could have been gathered from my profile on Etsy.com, the railroad connection could not. My grandfather was obsessed with all things railroad and dreamt of being an engineer. It was an unfulfilled dream as he worked at the shipyard most of his life. When I mentioned this to Kathy, she told me that she read my profile AFTER she emailed the reading to me.

There were many other connections that Kathy made in this brief but startling reading. I wondered if she could do this in a mini reading, what would a full reading bring? That question had yet to be answered, but if I decide to go on with that, I’ll let you know what comes of it. She has a blog, http://soulreaderblog.blogspot.com/ that will give you even more information about what she does and who she is.image

I highly recommend Kathy. Give it a try, what could it hurt?  luludesign.etsy.com  contact her for a listing for her mini reading…but I highly suggest you just plunge in and get her full reading. Something tells me you won’t be disappointed.

Craft or Art?

Some say crafting is not art and artists won’t fess up to say that they like to craft at times and do!  Well I have a dilemma and am going on record to let you know that my art has taken a new turn.  sold item

Several months ago I purchases a shadow box from a "craft store" yes, a craft store. I painted it and adorned it with a picture of Frida Kahlo, covered the inside of the the shelves with handmade paper and hung it on my wall above my workspace. There it hung for months with all of my calaveras, and trinkets people had given to me over the course of years.
I discovered that my art and the art of many hadn’t been selling on the site to which I belong and sell my pieces. I needed money and thought about that piece. So I did some tweaking to it added some fresh paint and placed it in my shop. It Sold.

 BLOG PHOTO
There is an ongoing debate about art vs. crafting and it was the topic of a chat I recently participated in. We agreed finally after a LONG discussion that, A crafter does what he/she does because it’s fun and relaxing. An artist does what he/she does, because they have to.
Since my muse has taken leave (it seems like an eternity since she came around to visit), my creativity has taken on a new kind of outlet. No, I am not going to be the next Picasso, Van Gogh or anything like that. I have resigned myself to knowing that no matter what, I HAVE to let the creativity that I hold inside, out. So, my newest turn/twist is painting "nichos".  

                                                    

102_1462
What is a nicho? A nicho is an object of Latino folk art. Nichos are made from mixed media and traditionally combine elements from Roman Catholicism, mestizo spirituality, and other cultural items of significance to the owner. Characteristically "nicho" objects have different names throughout the Latino culture, they may be called retablo or by other local names. It is common to see decorative boxes called "nichos" set upon tables and pedestals to display religious icons. These boxes may serve as a religious altar (to mark a significant religious event) or to honor a patron saint or to house calaveras (skeletons) of special significance.
These pieces are wooden boxes with a glass door. They can be used to house your calaveras or your special little pieces. The box door is painted and adorned with pictures in tin frames, skeletons (calaveras) and skulls.  At the bottom of the box door is yet another adornment  The shelves in the box are painted with acrylic paint and the back of each shelf is covered with handmade paper. The sides and back of the box are also painted. Shelves vary in height and length. The back of the box has a hanger with which to hang it on the wall with your other Latino favorites. It also latches on the side to keep your favorite items safe.

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The measurements of these nicho are as follows:
8" wide x 12" high x 1.5inches deep.
ALL OF THE NICHOS ARE FOR SALE AT   VanFleetStreetDesign.etsy.com

Silent Sunday

Sugar Skull 

Dia de los Muertos, Sugar Skull by Brett Ward (that’s me)

Wildly Blogging

I am currently reading a few books that I hope will help me in my endeavors online. Three books, you ask? Yep! you read correctly…three books. I find it easier to finish books if I switch back and forth and therefore get more usable information in a shorter amount of time?. I know it sounds really strange, but that’s how my brain works, and all you need to know is what I have gained from reading these helpful books.

“Blog Wild! A guide for small business blogging” by Andy Wibbels is the first book I will quickly summarize. Although this book is mostly geared toward the new blogger, I still had something to learn from Wibbels. His easy to read style makes getting through this book a breeze. It’s a small book and has very short chapters for those of  you who have SHORT attention spans, I would have to include myself in this category. The Chapters are 2 to 8 pages long, so if you don’t have a lot of time, you can get through a couple of chapters in no time.

Blog Wild

Wibbels covers everything from “What is a blog?” to “Promoting your blog” and further. This is a great little book to add to your collection and to the collective memory!

The next book will be featured in my following blog post. Happy reading!

"Muse, Muse Where Art Thou?"

TORCH

An inspiration

rides on a barebacked white horse

against the wind,

bearing gift-wrapped kindling

for an unlit fire,

salve for blistering hands.

An inspiration

lies awake at night

pondering the possibility of true love

with an unknown factor

who might change the outcome of the picture

completely.

An inspiration sits quietly in blue or red

for a place to live, alms for the poor, a marriage to

a blank canvas,  it never meets.

An inspiration fights at times,

just to stay alive.

________________

I wrote that poem many years ago in response to a friend who  had lost her inspiration and could no longer produce work she was proud to call her own. For whatever reason, her muse left on horseback one day and she was lost.

She told us she felt “vacant” as if part of her moved out without a 30 day notice.  She said she was forced to find another tenant to fill that space or she’d be bankrupt, so she started drinking. Sad as it was, she found a tenant that was far too eager to take up residence in her domicile and eventually forced her to allow a rent to own contract and bought her out in a few years. She was young but no longer had the will to keep going. Her art left her for good that day. A year later, she was found dead in an alley, apparently murdered.

It’s sad that we give up and walk away from the very thing that keeps our spirit alive and free, creativity. We often give up for reasons that seem confusing to others. I, along with countless others just shut down and don’t wait around for the door to open again, a door that will bring in a new and refreshed tenant who will gladly live in that sacred space inside us. What makes the muse move out without notice in the first place?  How do we produce one day and the next find an empty apartment?  Fear has been the basis of my “shutting down”, fear of success, fear of failure. That tag team can creep up on me like the enemy they are and ambush, leaving me tenant free, standing in a vacant room. And then there’s depression.

In her blog ” Case-notes from the Artsy Asylum” Susan Reynolds has posted an article about depression in creative folk, and cites this study: “Arnold Ludwig wondered the same thing. Lucky for us, he didn’t get distracted from Psychology and swept up in clay (you can probably guess who did that).As a result he’s now a professor, and a researcher at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Also an MD – so he’s just the guy to find out more about this.

And he did! In fact, it was a study of 1004 men and women over the span of 10-years. His group was made up of a wide variety of accomplished people in just as wide a variety of professions, including art, music, science, business, politics, and sports.

In the end, he found:

  • between 59 and 77 percent of the artists, writers, and musicians suffered mental illness  especially “mood disorders”
  • compared to just 18 to 29 percent in the less artistic professionals”

There are times when the Muse taps on the window asking to be let in, but we often don’t pay attention to that tapping, and instead go out and buy new locks and install them on the door by feeding our anxiety about not creating. Instead we scramble for something to take its place such as love, sex, alcohol, drugs and depression often fill that space.

Is there hope?  Yes. A friend of mine went to a career counselor to find out what she could do about this lack of inspiration. She was given several tools to try and decided on one that spoke to her. She purchased space for a want ad in the local newspaper. Her ad read something like this:

“WANTED: Muse for hire. Willing to pay any price to get the position filled. Needed for full time (24/7), year round work. No hiring process, no interview. Just show up if interested. Immediate start.”

It was just a small $5.00 ad, but it was something that served two purposes. She was able to realize just how desperate she had become trying to find that muse or at least another muse and how much her ability to create meant to her. Her ad was answered when she read it the next day in the paper. Although her artistic muse had left, another muse answered the call and gave her inspiration to write that ad. The drought ended and she was back at the easel that night. Now I know that was just too simple, but it does happen. Some of us wait for years for that muse to come knocking or calling to rent that apartment. For others, it returns in another form and still others it just never comes back.

If your muse has flown the coup, try bringing it back by venturing into another creative outlet. Think about something you’ve always wanted to try, like throwing a pot on a potter’s wheel or making a necklace out of jump rings or simply take a local art/craft class. Work on a project you’ve put off, read, go buy yourself a new pen or notebook, carve out a work space for yourself and sit there even if  you don’t do anything.  Remember that fear of failure and fear of success? Ask yourself, “What am I afraid of?” You can make plans for a dinner party, see a movie, paint a room. Rearrange your work space, or go to the local art store and look around. Find another avenue for creativity to seep back into your life. Sometimes I’m frozen and can’t do any of these things, but I have learned to not panic. I write and play my guitar. I write this blog because at the moment the paintbrush and canvas have stopped speaking to me. In order to keep that door ajar, I do something else. Once you stop thinking about the creative block, you open the door for your muse to come back.

Inspiration can come and go at a moment’s notice, or with no notice at all. Thinking outside of the box, utilizing other creative venues can be of greater value than looking to fill that empty apartment with destructive tenants. Think of the price.

“Artists are visited by the Muses, or tormented by their own passions and demons.” (Wes Nisker)

“O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention.” (William Shakespeare)

Please leave a comment on this blog. I would love to hear from you.

The Act of Marketing Your Website and Your Work

Some of you have requested an article on marketing and I have to admit, that is one area where I lack. When I think of Marketing, I think of getting out of my comfort zone and actually talking to people, and taking on new sites on the Internet, contacting galleries by postcard. It can be scary, but it is often necessary.

When I think of Marketing I think of spending money I don’t have to get something that I’m not sure I’m going to get, like SALES! There are no guarantees that any strategy will work in this day and age, but it never hurts to try.  Which leads me to telling you that I have done some research on marketing techniques for artists. I am going to share the simplest of them and hope that they’re not so simple that you have tried them all. So, grab a cup of coffee and spend a little time with this article and keep an open mind.

Marketing has many aspects and many options for the artist. Some avenues are simple and cost nothing, and others cost too much. Marketing can be so simple, yet so complex, or at least we can make it that. The big question is, What is marketing? Most people think that marketing is only about the advertising and/or personal selling of goods and services. Advertising and selling, however, are just two of the many marketing activities.

The American Marketing Association has unveiled a new definition of marketing to reflect the discipline’s broader role in society.  The new definition reads, ‘Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.’ ” Ok, you say, so what on earth does that mean?

Let’s talk about marketing activities for the artist, both on and offline. My “simple” suggestions for marketing your work and website are business cards, word of mouth, paid/free advertising, email, newsletters.

  • business cards-include these in your shipping of sold items. Be sure to have included your website, Etsy shop (if you have one) and your email address. The customer will appreciate the thought and might pass it along to other potential customers. It is important to have your business cards with you at all times. I had my hair cut the other day and was talking to my new hairstylist about my work. She asked if I had a business card and I gave her two. She was glad I gave her two because as she already had someone to give the other to!
  • word of mouth-my son and his friend were delivering Cub Scout fliers door to door the other day. They stopped at the local church and had a conversation with the pastor. He told her about my being an artist and she asked how she could see my work. He tried to show her how to get to my Etsy.com shop and was unsuccessful. So, he ran home and got one of my business cards and took it to her.
  • advertising– paid, plugs, comments on blogs, posting in forums are all forms of advertising. Paid Take a small ad in a newspaper, Google ad and other paid opportunities, if you have the funds. Plugs are free. Plugs are tiny advertising banners that you can place on someone’s blog or website but they have to have a “plug board” posted in order for you to do that. Comments on other people’s blogs are advertising in the simplest form. When I look at the comments of people I don’t know, I click on their name or avatar to see what they do.  Being involved on sites that provide forums are also a simple way of advertising. If I like what you say and your avatar is interesting, I click to see what it is that you do. A comment may ensue, I might save your site or shop in my favorites for future purchase possibilities.
  • email– Every email I send, has a signature that includes my name, artist, and links to my website, Etsy shop, cafepress shop, blog. According to the stats on my website, a lot of hits come from emails.
  • newsletters– This is something I just started for my own marketing. There are lots of sites and programs that offer templates for newsletters. I created mine in Microsoft Publisher. The newsletter can be used to announce a new series, a new website, a new blog, an award, a show. Send the newsletter either by mail or email to everyone you can think of, including previous customers. Look at it as a reminder that you’re around and are ever changing and adding to your work. This could bring in new purchases and returning customers.I intend to do a “mailing”  (actually an emailing ) this coming week to previous customers and friends.

All of these activities are useful when you are trying to market your work and your website. Of course not just one of these is going to bring the results you want, so mix and match until you get a successful combination.

Good luck!

I am always interested in your thoughts, opinions and suggestions. Please leave comments for me on this blog.

"What Do I Do Now?"

Now that you have made the decision to create a website or have one created for you, you might be asking, “What Do I Do Now?”

Well, I am about to answer that question! So sit back and relax, I will try to walk you through the next steps in your process.

Keep it simple. That could be the most important tip I can give you today. Don’t add so many tabs or pictures or text that it keeps the potential customer or gallery owner there too long. In this day and age, no one has time to sit in front of a computer and sift through your poorly planned site to figure out how to use it. Keep it simple.

Some of the tabs you use might be the following:

  • Home– this page will be the first glimpse of your website. This is what  people will see when their browser opens your page. Keep it clean, keep it interesting, remembering that first impressions make or break you.
  • About the Artist– keep this simple as well. Don’t write  your autobiography with all of the details on this page. Give highlights that pertain to you as an artist and keep the focus on YOU. If you want to include your artistic philosophy here, make sure it’s neatly separated from your bio.
  • Gallery– You don’t have to have every piece you’ve made on this page. Post a few pieces that show the diversity in your work. You don’t want to show that you’re locked into a style that you can’t get out of. Show some old work and new work.
  • Links– Keep the links list, to a minimum. If you have logos for the sites on which you have your work, use them and link them to the site (this will make it easier for the viewer to go see what you are doing there). Link photos to the site where you sell that piece. Again, no one wants to sift through things. They want what they want to see, at their fingertips.
  • Contact the Artist– Offer a simple form that the viewer can fill out to comment or ask questions, that will be sent directly to your email account.
  • Etsy page -(if you are a crafter, and your main purpose to having a website is to drive business to your Etsy shop (or other shops) I would say to do this). If you are an artist looking for gallery representation and/or sales from this site, you might be wise to leave this out as not all gallery owners think Etsy a viable or suitable place for serious artists to sell.(This is up to  you, of course!) If you are an artist to whom gallery representation is not a priority, but this site is to get your work “out there” it’s your choice as well.

Please remember, this is not a blog. Keep the focus on you and your art. (It’s ok to mention your wife, husband or girlfriend/boyfriend, kids as people in your life with whom you live, but keep it focused and don’t ramble on about them). A  website is a factual tool that represents your work to the online world. This is not intended to necessarily bring out your personality, or be cute, you can use your blog for that. If you want to be taken seriously as an artist, you need to make the decision about what it is you want this website to do.

You can do this and keep it simple!  If this is your first time, keep these tips in mind and you’ll have a more interesting site.Happy Website to YOU!

Next post will hopefully address some marketing techniques that can drive viewers to your site.

I See a Website in Your Future

Picture this if you will, you walk into a sparsely lit room that is adorned with beautiful silks, and beads. The air is thick with excitement and incense. Your heart is pounding, your pulse is racing as you see table covered in a breath-taking silk table cloth in the middle of the room, with two chairs sitting opposite of each other. On the table sits a crystal ball, nothing else. In walks the woman who is going to tell you your future. She is dressed in the same silks that surround you; she offers you to sit at the table. She sits down and asks a few questions, then begins to tell you what she sees…If I could tell your fortune, and give you great news about a flourishing creative business with lots of sales and notoriety, I would definitely tell you about it. But alas, I can’t do that so I am going to fill you in on some information about something that could also tell your future, but with some work on your part…WEBSITES. I know, it could be a boring post, but it’s not!

If you’ve ventured offline to expand your horizons and spoken with gallery owners, shop owners who offer consignment, local juried shows, organizations you are applying to become a member of, you’ve probably heard some of the following questions: “Do you have a website? What’s your web address? Is your website listed on your business card?” The word “website'” is a common buzzword you might want to pay attention to. Articles I have read, books I have scanned and artists with whom I have spoken all swear by the necessity of artists having their own…yes, you guessed it, website. Don’t be alarmed, or have an anxiety attack,it’s not as scary an on-taking as you might think. I promise I am not going to get technical.

Let’s just explore some reasons why it’s a unanimous vote for artists to have their own website…it won’t be painful or scary.
Firstly, your own website will give you exposure. Websites can offer exposure to artists, people and organizations wouldn’t otherwise know exist. A potential customer in Illinois has no clue that they would like and probably purchase a piece from a silk artist in North Carolina, if they don’t know the artist is around. A gallery owner in London would have no idea that there is an artist living and creating in Toronto whom she would love to represent! An organization such as Worldwide Women Artists doesn’t know the hard working glass artist producing gorgeous pieces in Maine and that they would love to include on their member charter, if there is nothing happening with promotion. Remember the story of the tree falling in the forest and no one is there to hear it?

Some art schools require a portfolio these days for admittance. Some will ask for a web- site to suffice that requirement. If you want to join an organization or an art club, they may ask to see your website to view examples of your work. It is much easier for people in these positions to view a simple site than to wait for your cd to arrive (or not) and find it amongst all of the other cd’s they are inundated with on a daily basis.

Secondly, a website allows you to keep all of your work in one place. Yes, that spells organization, oh, you have heard of that haven’t you? Artists are not known to be organized, that’s why we marry people who are! Just kidding. Imagine, all of the examples of your work contained in one place, wouldn’t that be a miracle? If someone asks to see your work whilst riding the train to the city, hand them your business card! They can then go to your site and take a look and all of it will be there. There’s nothing like being asked to be able to view your work and you have nowhere to send them. You want to be thought of as a professional artist don’t you? Maybe it’s time to act like one and having this tool will assist you on that journey.

Lastly, the final word…sales. If you want to sell your work and not have to pay fees in order to list it, then pay fees when it sells, an e-commerce website is the way to go. The potential customer goes to your website, views your work, purchases it from you and that’s that. You decide if you’re going to accept credit cards, money orders, personal checks, PayPal, REM etc. There’s no one else involved! And as sites that allow you to sell your work through them begin to get overcrowded, therefore minimizing sales, e-commerce sites are taking root as another more personal alternative to sell your wares.

Now that you have seen what a web site can do for you, how do you go about getting one? There are many sites that offer free websites, and make it easy for you to create it using templates. If you blog, you know that blog sites offer templates for that. Well these sites offer templates to you to get you started. Some templates aren’t flexible and therefore you might get bored with them rather quickly if you like to change things around a lot. These sites are great places to get started, to get your feet wet and they don’t charge anything to enter the pool! Here are some free website companies that don’t have hidden charges at first glance, they are completely free: Microsoft Office Live, CrawlDog.com, geocites.com , mosaicglobe.com weebly.com Of course there are others, but these were the sites that had the simplest layouts and upgrades are available for a cost.

If you are able to afford it, you might want to work with a professional web designer to design this new business opportunity. There are many of them out there, some good, some not so good. Prices shouldn’t vary too much from one to the next, and if they do, be wise about their training and ask questions, ask to see their portfolio or THEIR site! If you decide to go this route, be sure you have your plan written down and have a clear idea what you want it to look like and who your target customers are. If the designer spends only an hour with you and then runs off to design, you are probably going to be seeing a lot of that person in the future. Ask questions, give the designer the clearest possible instructions and needs. Creativity is fluid, ever changing and our ideas, our “product” is ever evolving with us. You will want to invest in this web site so it lasts for a specified period of time. You really don’t want to have to spend that money every year or so, do you? Be sure to have your ducks in a row and you get what you want and need the first time around.

So, to wrap this up, websites offer new possibilities for artists in this ever changing world. Whether you try a simple, free website for starters, or hire a professional, it’s an opportunity for you to gain the exposure Van Gogh, Vermeer, Whistler and others could not have dreamed of. A website offers organization, and a more personal atmosphere from which to sell the work you love to make! Try it, it doesn’t hurt and you’ll learn a lot. You might just have some fun along the way.

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